English Books: The English Teacher

When Krishna teaches at the Albert Mission College his wife and daughter live some distance away with his parents-in-law.
But a move to a small rented house soon permits the couple to enjoy a life of marital bliss.
Yet paradise is short-lived…

The story

The story is about a man which is a teacher and enjoys the life of a simple “celibately” peace living in one of the community camp close to his university, but there comes time when he is pushed by his parents and his parents-in-law to buy a house and live with his wife and daughter.

They move to the new house in a new neighborhood but yet his wife get sick with a strange illness. The book concentrates over the hardship of daily life and the relationships between the newlyweds and some other mystical occurrences which I am not going to reveal for the sake of not spoiling the story for you.

I was kind of skeptical when I read some of the first chapters but afterwards I changed my mind on a 360 degree.
I become truly fond of Krishnan – an amiable, rather idealistic but immature protagonist. The depiction of family life is a delight… But when disaster strikes, you feel his suffering as your very own.
The story of this book could teach you wisdom, gratitude and acceptance only by observing the life of its characters.

The Characters

All way to the very end of the book I was admiring the capability of the main protagonist to accept the “fate” in his life.
The way he was living, reflecting on life and changing his attitude towards people and situations. The feeling and wise nature of his daughter which you could say that understands everything without the need to express it through words.
Like she knew somehow the tragedy in their lives and at the same time she was overgrowing it at that very moment.
His best friend which was his daughter’s teacher was again in similar position. He had a wife and a lot of kids to look for. His wife was always complaining about their poor life so his husband was deliberately avoiding her by going to teach the kids in the child school. He was finding joy in the everyday activities with the kids and he was trying to pass that wisdom to Krishna.
My humble opinion is that you should read the book so you could live a small part of the rural Indian life of these days.

Language complexity

The book is on the easy tier. There weren’t a lot of complex meanings or difficult concepts to grasp.
Maybe there were some specific words from the Indian culture but you could filling the gaps easy enough by reading the context.

Pace of Action

I would say that this book brings some odd feel of acceptance, of fluidity of the life of the main protagonist, his somewhat older than her actual age daughter Leela and his closest friend a child teacher in a local school.
The book posses the power to engulf you and you could read it very fast but in the same time the appearance of misfortunes could make you lay the book for a while and reflect on the lives of these people. And making some check ups or “relax” by yourself keeping your inner peace intact.

Satisfaction

It may be not one of the most happy or fortunate books which I have read but I was sympathizing with the life journey of Krishnan and his family and friend’s stories. Somewhat I felt them close to me. Sometimes you may wonder that maybe we are more connected to each other than we are thinking. Maybe these “simple” life stories are uniting us people all over different parts of the world under the same road towards personal revelation, gratitude for what we have and somewhere there still questioning our life paths and choices until our last day on Earth.
There were some mixture of wisdom, of Indian culture, of mystery, of divinity and a sprinkle of simply daily life.
In general I was very satisfied with the book and I am thinking to buy more books of the same author.

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